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January 30, 2019 Uncategorized

published on Urology Times

By Lisette Hilton
January 30, 2019

Minimally invasive surgical options took front and center in 2018 when the AUA published its revised guideline on the surgical management of male lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to BPH.

The revised guideline includes recommendations for the UroLift and Rezum devices, which received FDA clearance in 2013 and 2015, respectively.

“In patients who have bothersome symptoms and have prostates of 30 to 80 grams, the UroLift and Rezum are reasonable options,” said guideline co-author Steven A. Kaplan, MD, professor of urology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and director of Mount Sinai’s Benign Urologic Diseases and Men’s Health Program.

Aquablation and prostate artery embolization (PAE) are newer, promising BPH treatments, but the guideline authors suggested there were not enough data at the time of publication to recommend them for clinical practice. Prostate artery embolization should be performed for the time being in a clinical trial rather than in practice, according to Dr. Kaplan.

“Most of the new technologies in BPH occupy a position between drugs and established surgery, such as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and laser treatments,” said urologist Peter Gilling, MD, professor of surgery at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. “Durability is an important issue for each, but antegrade ejaculation is usually preserved.”

Urologists don’t remove as much tissue with the minimally invasive options as with TURP, so there’s a recurrence rate and urologists should discuss that with patients, according to Dr. Kaplan.

Read: High paternal age may raise PCa rate

Recognizing minimally invasive options for BPH symptom improvement is a move in the right direction for patients because medical management might not be in patients’ best interest, according to Art R. Rastinehad, DO, associate professor of urology and radiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

“Is giving BPH patients an alpha-blocker the right thing to do? These alpha-blockers can cause side effects: dementia, depression. And other treatments we use can alter men’s hormone levels and cause changes in mood [and] decreased libido,” Dr. Rastinehad said. “With minimally invasive treatments, men can be off their medications and get great results.”

Click here to read the full article on Urology Times


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September 6, 2017 Uncategorized

published on Insider.com
by Kristin Salaky Sep. 6, 2017

 

Having sex comes with a lot of responsibilities. You should show a certain level of enthusiasm, practice good consent, and listen to what your partners need. You should also be getting frequent STI tests — a simple task that people tend to forget.

Most people know that they should be getting tested for STIs, but many aren’t doing it enough or doing it at all. Knowing your up-to-date STI status is important information that allows you and potential partners to make safer, more informed decisions about what you’re doing in bed.

So what constitutes as “up-to-date?” Well that depends on who you are and who you ask.

Click here to read the full article on Insider.com


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August 1, 2017 Uncategorized

published on WLNY: A CBS Affiliate

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — We’re used to seeing gold in our jewelry, but what about in medicine? More specifically — cancer medicine.

As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported, that’s the latest approach to treating prostate cancer. It uses nanoparticles of gold and lasers to kill the cancer cells.

The beauty of gold is that it remains inert in the body until it’s hit with a laser beam and gets hot — so if you put really tiny bits of gold into a tumor and then light it up with a laser, the heat would kill the cancer.

Doctors have now figured out how to do this.

 

Click here to read the full article on WLNY: A CBS Affiliate


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February 20, 2017 Uncategorized

published on Clinical Oncology News

San Antonio—To some urologic oncologists, treating only the tumor and not the whole gland in a man with prostate cancer just doesn’t sound right.

“I understand that for many people, the concept of focal therapy for the prostate gives them a visceral disgust, they can hardly say the words,” said Scott Eggener, MD, an associate professor of surgery-urologic oncology and the co-director of the prostate cancer program at the University of Chicago Medicine.

With that high hurdle to jump, Dr. Eggener and the other panelists presented their rationale in a session on partial gland ablation at the 2016 annual meeting of the Society of Urologic Oncology.

 

Click here to read the full article on ClinicalOncologyNews.com


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November 1, 2016 Uncategorized

published on WLNY: A CBS Affiliate

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — What do tiny bits of gold and laser beams have in common? Combined they are the latest exciting technique for treating prostate cancer.

As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez explained, it might avoid most of the side effects of other prostate treatments.

“I had a biopsy and it showed cancer,” Marty Feeney said.

It was an elevated PSA blood test that led Marty Feeney to have the biopsy. At first his doctor recommended active surveillance — keeping close watch to see if his cancer showed signs of spreading and becoming life threatening. After a couple years, it did.

“I’d have to do something, and I didn’t know if it would be surgery or radiation,” he said, “I would rather avoid surgery.”

Instead, Marty volunteered to be the first in the world to have an innovative new technique that uses microscopic nanoparticles of gold fifty times smaller than a red blood cell.

 

Click here to read the full article on WLNY: A CBS Affiliate


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May 29, 2016 Uncategorized

published on WFMZ

NEW YORK – Arcenio Miller has prostate cancer, but he feels good knowing that doctors have a very clear picture of his condition.

“More lesions came out and more spots were detected,” Miller said.

Doctors, using a system called UroNav, found cancer in an area of Miller’s prostate that would not have been targeted by a traditional biopsy.

UroNav fuses together a patient’s MRI and ultrasound to create a highly-detailed 3D view of the prostate.

“We’re able to guide the needles in the treatment area and just focus on that specific spot,” explained Dr. Art Rastinehad, director of focal therapy and interventional urologic oncology and an associate professor of urology and radiology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

 

Click here to read the full article on WFMZ


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December 30, 2015 Uncategorized

published on KFSN: An ABC Affiliate

NEW YORK. (KFSN) – For decades, doctors have diagnosed prostate cancer using what’s been called a ‘blind’ biopsy, removing and testing a dozen tiny tissue samples to see if cancer is present. Now, new technology is taking the guesswork out of the procedure by allowing doctors to precisely target suspicious areas where deadly cells may be lurking.

High-tech images and an electromagnetic tracking system, like GPS for the body, work together, giving doctors more information than ever before.

Arcenio Miller has prostate cancer. But he feels good knowing that doctors have a very clear picture of his condition. Miller told Ivanhoe, “More lesions came out and more spots were detected.”

Doctors found cancer in an area of Miller’s prostate that would not have been targeted by a traditional biopsy, using a system called UroNav.

UroNav fuses together a patient’s MRI and ultrasound to create a highly-detailed 3D view of the prostate.

Art Rastinehad, D.O., Director of Focal Therapy and Interventional Urologic Oncology and Associate Professor of Urology and Radiology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai said, “We’re able to guide the needles in the treatment area and just focus on that specific spot.”

 

Click here to read the full article on KFSN: An ABC Affiliate


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August 6, 2014 Uncategorized

published on WebMD

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) – The value of the PSA test to screen men for prostate cancer has long been debated, and a new study of 162,000 men may not resolve the issue.The European study, reported Aug. 6 in The Lancet, finds that widespread use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests does reduce deaths from the disease by about one-fifth.However, due to lingering doubts about whether the benefits of PSA screening outweigh the risks, the study’s authors still recommend against routine use of the test at this time.

 

Click here to read full the article WebMD


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Dr. Rastinehad is board certified by the American Board of Urology. He has expertise in an array of interventional radiological and surgical techniques.

Dr. Art Rastinehad © 2019 | Website by CURE